London Crime Prevention Fund – Co-commissioning Fund Tranche 1

Reference code: 
PCD 310
Date signed: 
13 February 2018
Authorisation name: 
Sophie Linden, Deputy Mayor, Policing and Crime

Executive summary

MOPAC has powers under the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 (formerly under the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011) to award grants to secure the reduction of crime and disorder in London. 

The London Crime Prevention Fund (LCPF) was established in 2013, and ran until March 2017 (DMPCD 2013/96). In 2016, despite pressures on the policing budget, the Mayor committed to continuing the LCPF budget over the next four years (2017-2021). A new approach to the LCPF was introduced that split the LCPF into two parts: direct funding to boroughs and the Co-Commissioning Fund (CCF) (DMPCD 79). This decision is in relation to the LCPF CFF. 

The CCF runs from 2018/19 to 2020/21 and currently stands at approx. £14.5m. The CCF has been divided in to two tranches: Tranche 1 a maximum of £10m that was eligible for bids in regards to the four priority areas of the Police and Crime Plan: Child Sexual Exploitation, female offending, sexual violence and youth offending and running for the full three years (2018/19 – 2020/21) and Tranche 2 £4.5m running for two years (2019/20 – 2020/21). 

The purpose of this decision is to confirm the funding allocation for Tranche 1 of the CCF. The CCF has been allocated via a competitive grant award process between April 2017 and January 2018. A further DMPC decision will be made in 2018/19 to allocate Tranche 2 of the fund. 
A separate decision was made on the direct funding to boroughs (DMPCD 79).
 

Recommendation

The DMPC is asked to:
•    Approve the award of a maximum of £10 million funding, subject to confirmation of grant conditions and assurances of match funding, specifically:
o    Approve the award of £2,996,940 to a consortium led by Advance Advocacy and Non-Violence Community Education over 3 years (2018/19 – 2020/21) for the provision of a sub-regional female offender service.
o    Approve the award of £1,857,863 to a consortium led by Barnardo’s over 3 years (2018/19 – 2020/21) for the provision of a sub-regional harmful sexual behaviour perpetrators programme. 
o    Approve the award of £1,606,173 to the London borough of Lambeth over 3 years (2018/19 – 2021) for the provision of a sub-regional female offender’s service. 
o    Approve the award of £3,036,916 to a consortium led by the London borough of Brent and London Borough of Lewisham over 3 years (2018/19 – 2020/21) for the provision of a pan-London programme to improve the identification and response to the exploitation of young people by organised criminals.
•    Delegate responsibility for the award of the remaining Tranche 1 CCF funding, up to a maximum of £787,108 and no less than £502,108 to the Chief Executive Officer.
•     Delegate responsibility for the finalisation of contracts/grant arrangements related to the work described in section 1, including delegating responsibility for finalising relevant terms and signing of relevant agreements to the Chief Executive Officer. 
 

Non-confidential facts and advice to the Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime (DMPC)

1.    Introduction and background

1.1.    Section 143 of the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 gives the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime the power to award a grant to any person in order to secure or contribute to securing crime and disorder reduction in the police area and to help victims of witnesses of, or other persons affected by, offences and anti-social behaviour. The grant may be subject to any conditions that the Mayor (or Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime) may deem appropriate.

1.2.    The London Crime Prevention Fund (LCPF) was created in 2013 as a four year fund which ended in March 2017 (DMPCD 2013/96). 

1.3.    In November 2016, the DMPC approved the continuation of the LCPF budget with two significant changes to the overall approach, for a further four years (2017/18 to 2020/21) in line in with the current Police and Crime Plan (DMPCD 2016/79). This apportions the LCPF budget between direct borough funding and funding for co-commissioned services starting in year 2 of the fund, from 2018/19 to 2020/21.

1.4.    Direct borough funding has been allocated to all London boroughs for 2017/18 – 2018/19 (DMPCD 2016/79). A further DMPC decision will be made in 2018/19 to finalise the allocations for 2019/20 and 2020/21.

1.5.    The Co-Commissioning Fund (CCF) has been developed in the context of both entrenched and emerging community safety challenges in London, the Mayor’s Police and Crime Plan (PCP) for London (2017 – 2021) and London borough priorities. It will be released in two tranches: April 2018 (£10m) and April 2019 (£4.5m).

1.6.    NHS England, have indicated an additional £285,000 to Tranche 1 of the CCF to address female offending. This will bring the total funding available in Tranche 1 to £10,285,000. 

1.7.    There may also be opportunity to use funding from the Ministry of Justice to support activity within the successful projects – where this is possible, savings (money that is freed up from the CCF Tranche 1 allocation) will pulled back into the main LCPF CCF pot for use with tranche 2.

1.8.    Tranche 1 of the fund was eligible for bids based on the following four priority areas linked to the Police and Crime Plan for London 2017 - 2021:
•    Youth offending
•    Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)
•    Sexual violence 
•    Female offending

1.9.    In line with MOPAC’s wider commissioning approach, Tranche 1 of the CCF was allocated based on a competitive grants process that was open to consortia of London boroughs, other statutory organisations, VCS organisations or commercial organisations. This process commenced on 30 June 2017. 

1.10.    Subject to DMPC approval, this decision awards funding up to the value of £10,285,000 for the following:

The top 4 scoring projects:
•    Wraparound support services for female offenders – £2,996,940 over three years for a sub-regional service for female offenders in 15 London boroughs (Barking & Dagenham, Brent, Camden, Ealing, Hammersmith & Fulham, Hounslow, Haringey, Harrow, Havering, Hillingdon, Islington, Kensington & Chelsea, Newham, Waltham Forest Westminster). The service will provide female offenders with wraparound support services including keyworker support, group-work, mentoring, and other specialist support. Delivered by a consortium of Advance Advocacy and Non-Violence Community Education (consortium lead), London CRC, National Probation Service, London boroughs of Barking & Dagenham, Brent, Camden, Ealing, Hammersmith & Fulham, Hounslow, Haringey, Harrow, Havering, Hillingdon, Islington, Kensington & Chelsea, Newham, Waltham Forest, Westminster and Turning Point, Hibiscus, Clean Break, Working Chance, Housing for Women, Airnetwork, Heart & Mind, Young Mums Support Network, SafeGround, Inspirit, and Prison Reform Trust. 


•    Taith (Journey) London - £1,857,863 over 3 years for the provision of a sub-regional harmful sexual behaviour perpetrators programme in 9 London boroughs (Barking & Dagenham, Bexley, Greenwich, Hammersmith & Fulham, Havering, Kensington & Chelsea, Redbridge, Wandsworth and Westminster). The service will provide child-centred, trauma-informed interventions to perpetrators and incorporate creative and CBT-informed interventions, psychosexual education and best practice. It will be delivered by a consortium of Barnardo’s (consortium lead), London boroughs of Barking & Dagenham, Bexley, Greenwich, Hammersmith & Fulham, Havering, Kensington & Chelsea, Redbridge, Wandsworth and Westminster.


•    Whole System Approach to Female Offending - South London Alliance - £1,606,173 over three years for a sub-regional service for female offending in 6 London boroughs (Croydon, Lambeth, Lewisham, Southwark, Sutton and Wandsworth). The service will put in place a whole system approach to supporting female offenders and those at risk of offending, including early intervention, triage, resettlement and increasing women centre provisions. Delivered by a consortium of London boroughs of Lambeth (consortium lead), Croydon, Lewisham, Southwark, Sutton and Wandsworth, London CRC, National Probation Service, Women in Prison, Pecan, Advance Minerva, Housing for Women, and Prison Reform Trust. 


•    Out There (OT) Response and Rescue - £3,036,916 over three years for a pan-London service across the 32 London boroughs. The service will develop and deliver a support service for young people who are vulnerable and caught up in county lines drug distribution networks across our region. It will be delivered by a consortium of London boroughs of Brent and Lewisham (consortium leads), St Giles, Abianda, Safer London, MPS, London CRC and YJB. 

Unallocated funding
•    The award of the top 4 scoring projects leaves between £502,108 and £787,108 of Tranche 1 of the CCF unallocated. The final amount is dependent upon partner organisation investment in the final agreement.
•    To ensure that this funding is fully utilised and to ensure a transparent funding allocation process, the two projects tied in 5th place in the development stage assessment process will be invited to submit a revised proposal for the unallocated funding.
•    Following an assessment of the revised proposals, the unallocated funding may be awarded to one of the above projects. Under MOPAC scheme of delegation, responsibility for the award of the unallocated funding of up to £787,108 will be delegated to the Chief Executive Officer. 
•    If it is not possible to award the unallocated funding to the above projects, the unallocated funding will be carried forward into Tranche 2 of the CCF. 

1.11.    Tranche 1 CCF funded services will run in 2018/19, 2019/20 and 2020/21. Conditional grants will be developed and agreed with the consortia lead for each project. This will be outcome based, according to MOPAC strategic commissioning approach. MOPAC may also directly commission elements of the projects, on the request of the consortia. Data will be gathered to monitor delivery against outcomes on a quarterly basis and iteratively to inform evaluation of the CCF. 

2.    Issues for consideration

Consultation

2.1.    MOPAC has worked with London boroughs and wider partners to develop and implement the CCF. In addition to consultation (through the London Council’s Leaders committee, London Council’s members group, Chief Executives of London Councils and London Heads of Community Safety meetings), the CCF Working Group was established to support this process.

2.2.    The CCF working group is chaired by a representative from London Councils as well as other partners. The working group supported the development of the CCF processes (including funding prospectus and application documents) and determined the priority areas of focus for Tranche 1 of the fund. Representatives from the working group were also part of the assessment panels for the Expression of Interest (EOI) and development stage. The working group will continue to support tranche 2 of the CCF as well as providing oversight of funded projects. 

Process

2.3.    A two-stage competitive process was undertaken with the aim of awarding funding. This process commenced on 30 June and closed on 1 December 2017. 

2.4.    In the first stage, a funding prospectus was published and partners were invited to submit an EOI setting out how much funding was requested and how this funding would be used. 43 EOIs with a total value of £58.6m were received. These were evaluated against the criteria set out in the funding prospectus by multi-agency panels. All members of the CCF working group were invited to be part of the panels and membership included MOPAC officers, Local Authorities, statutory partners and the VCS. The EOI criteria included adherence to funding criteria, quality of the proposal, outcomes and value for money. Based on the evaluation the panels made a recommendation to the co-chairs of the CCF working group, who decided which EOIs progressed to stage 2 – full development of proposals. In line with the funding prospectus, key factors of spread across priorities, reasonable geographical coverage and number of projects to be funded were considered when making this decision. 

2.5.    8 EOIs progressed into stage 2. Additional guidance for developing full funding proposals was provided to those moving into stage 2. The full proposals for these 8 projects were received by the application deadline of 1 December. The proposals were initially assessed by a multi-agency panel against set evaluation criteria which were published in the development stage guidance. Again, all members of the working group were invited to be part of the assessment panel. Panel membership included MOPAC officers, London Councils and Local Authority representatives. The overall criteria and weightings are set out in the attached document. 

2.6.    The panel made a recommendation to the co-chairs of the working group. The co-chairs of the working group then made a recommendation to the Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime (DMPC) on which proposals should be funded. As set out in both the funding prospectus and development guidance, in making this recommendation the co-chairs considered the panel scoring, as well as spread across priorities, reasonable geographical coverage and number of projects to be funded. 

2.7.    The recommendation of the co-chairs was that MOPAC appoint the following four top scoring proposals:
•    Advance Advocacy and Non-Violence Community Education with its consortium partners to provide a sub-regional female offender service. 
•    Barnardo’s with is consortium of partners for the provision of a sub-regional harmful sexual behaviour perpetrators programme. 
•    London borough of Lambeth with its consortium partners for the provision of a sub-regional female offender service. 
•    London borough of Brent and London Borough of Lewisham with their consortium partners to provide a pan-London programme to improve the identification and response to the exploitation of young people by organised criminals.

2.8    Options were presented on how best to utilise unallocated funding from Tranche 1. The preferred option of the co-chairs, recommended to the DMPC, was to invite the two projects scoring in 5th place in the assessment process to submit revised proposals for the remaining funding. 

3.    Financial Comments

3.1.    This decision paper will commit MOPAC to providing of £10m over 3 years (2018/19 – 2020/21).

3.2.    This cost can be met from within the approved LCPF budget for 2018/19 – 2020/21.

3.3.    NHS England have provided additional funding of £285,000 to Tranche 1 of the CCF to address female offending.

3.4.    There may also be opportunity to use funding from the Ministry of Justice to support activity within the successful projects – where this is possible, savings (money that is freed up from the CCF Tranche 1 allocation) will be allocated to the main LCPF CCF pot for Tranche 2. 

3.5.    If unallocated funding for Tranche 1 cannot be utilised this will be carried forward in Tranche 2. 

3.6.    While the CCF only accounts for a small portion of the Main Policing Grant, there is a risk that committing funding over a three-year period affects MOPAC’s ability to mitigate the potential impact of planned reforms to the police funding formula in 2018/19. 

3.7.    It is a core criterion of the CCF that projects are match funded (this may include match in kind). Grant agreements for funded projects will include conditions that the CCF enhances investment by other partners and that the CCF must not be used to replace investment by other partners. This will include central government funding through agencies such as the London CRC. MOPAC will expect partners to work collaboratively and transparently to support this. 

4.    Legal Comments

4.1.    Under section 143(1)(a) of the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 MOPAC has the power (in its capacity as the Local Policing Body for London) to provide services that, in its opinion, secure or contribute to securing, crime and disorder reduction in the body’s area. Section 143 grants MOPAC the power to secure such services by the means of providing grants to third parties. For the purposes of the 2014 Act, “crime and disorder reduction” means reduction in levels of—
(a) crime and disorder (including anti-social behaviour and other behaviour adversely affecting the local environment),
(b) the misuse of drugs, alcohol and other substances, and
(c) re-offending.
Section 143(1)(b) of the 2014 Act also permits MOPAC to provide services that help victims and witnesses of, and individuals affected by, crime and anti-social behaviour. These services may be secured by MOPAC through the provision of grants to third parties. 

4.2    The recommendations in this report indicate that the decisions requested of the Deputy Mayor are within MOPAC’s statutory powers. 

4.2.    Under MOPAC’s Scheme of Delegation pursuant to s.19 of the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011, approval of the strategy for the award of individual grants and the award of all individual grants (for crime reduction or other purposes) is a matter generally reserved to the DMPC (paragraph 4.8). The release of funding in accordance with the proposals set out in this decision form is accordingly to be approved by the DMPC. The delegation of responsibility for the finalisation of planning and contractual/grant arrangements, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Executive Officer is in accordance with the general power of delegation in paragraph 5.4, and the specific power of delegation in paragraph 5.12.

4.3.    The Chief Executive Officer must ensure that appropriate documentation is put in place before awarding the relevant grants/entering into the relevant contracts. The Chief Executive Officer must also comply with MOPAC Financial Regulations and Contract Regulation when signing and/or finalising the terms of such contracts/grant agreements.  

5.    Equality Comments

5.1.    MOPAC is required to comply with the public sector equality duty set out in section 149(2) of the Equality Act 2010.  This requires MOPAC to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination, harassment and victimisation; advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations by reference to people with protected characteristics.  The protected characteristics are: age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation.

5.2.    The Police and Crime Plan and associated commissioning plans are based on two principles:
•    Victims First – putting victims at the heart of everything we do. 
•    Reducing inequalities in communities – a focus on setting an agreed standard and addressing the disparities we see across the city. 

5.3    To address the inequalities that exist in London, MOPAC has four targeted priorities directed at those people who are disproportionately affected by crime. The priorities aim to provide specialised services that safeguard the most vulnerable in society and reduce evident existing inequalities. These priorities are reflected in MOPAC’s victims’ commissioning plans over the next three years and are as follows:
•    A better police service for London
•    A better Criminal Justice Service for London
•    Keeping Children and Young People Safe
•    Tackling Violence Against Women and Girls

5.4.    As shown through analysis of crime and criminal justice data, there are some communities that are overrepresented amongst offending and victimisation data. In addition, analysis indicates that those living in deprived neighbourhoods are more likely to commit or be the victim of crime. The proposed projects within this decision will ensure that additional specialist services are made available for females who offend, young people affected by child sexual exploitation and young victims of criminal exploitation, specifically:


•    The Wrap Around Support Service for Female Offenders and Whole System Approach to Female Offending (South London Alliance) projects are intended to reduce female offending, improve alternatives to custody, reduce numbers of children taken into care due to the imprisonment of their mother and address violence against women and girls. They therefore address three of the PCP priority areas. This service has been informed by research and analysis of crime and criminal justice data which show that whilst there is a low volume of female offenders in London they have high levels of vulnerability and harm.


•    Taith (Journey) London Service is intended to prevent and reduce harmful sexual behaviour, improve outcomes and life chances for children and young people and support stronger families and safer childhoods. It addresses four of the PCP priority areas. The service has been informed by, and is supportive of, the previously MOPAC and NHS England commissioned needs assessments into sexual violence and child sexual exploitation. 


•    Out There (OT) Response and Rescue project is intended to reduce gang-affiliated offending, reduce number of young people going missing and support safer and stronger communities. It addresses three of the PCP priorities. The project has been informed by research and analysis of crime and criminal justice data which shows that children at risk of exploitation have multiple and complex vulnerable and that there are gaps in services for young people from London who are caught up in county lines. 

5.5    In addition, equalities implications will be part of the decision process for the unallocated funding, as per MOPAC’s standard processes. 

6.    Background/supporting papers

Annex 1: DMPCD 79


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